Every Ending

Four persons fight a power struggle with sexuality and language as weapons. Based on Quartett, a play of the famous author Heiner Müller.

Every Ending takes Heiner Müller’s legendary play Quartett as its starting point. The now legendary text is an adaptation of Pierre Choderlos de Laclos’ epistolary novel Les liaison dangereuses from 1782. In the hands of director Wouter Van Looy and the young collective LÂP, it becomes an intense music theatre performance in which Valmont and Merteuil, Cécile and Tourvel raise their voice through the music of Roy Orbisson, Messiaen, Poulenc and Nico

LÂP is a TRANSLAB resident. 

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Muziektheater Transparant, LÂP and Perpodium.

Coproduction: Wintervuur and Perpodium.

With the support of Tax Shelter of the Belgian Federal Government and the Flemish Government.

Location Dates Hour
Wintervuur (Antwerpen)
www.wintervuur.be
Show on map
30/12/2019
31/12/2019
2/1/2020
4/1/2020
21:00
21:00
21:00
21:00

Concept | Direction: Wouter Van LooyScenography: Sascha van RielCostumes: Johanna TrudzinskiSound Design: Jo ThielemansLight Design: Anne Van Es • Music I Vocals: Les Âmes Perdues Naomi BeeldensEwout LehoucqIsaak DuerinckKatrin Lohmann

Every Ending balances between austerity and the flamboyance of a cabaret. Every Ending is at its very sharpest when denouncing hypocrisy and the abuses of the church. … If there is one thing that Every Ending does, it is to show how cruel people can be and that relationships revolve around ‘possessing someone’ and triumphing over someone else. … No one who is open to this will find themselves bored by Valmont’s game. On the contrary, it makes one think, in both psychological and philosophical terms.

Concertnews.be ***, 30 December 2019

This too is essential music theatre, with plenty of costume changes, but darker than usual, as if David Lynch were in the director’s chair. The piece harks back to Heiner Müller’s Quartett (1980), which was based on Choderlos de Laclos’ Les liaisons dangereuses (1782), … LÂP frames its story with stunning beauty, in a set comprising swaying dark-red drapes and with lingering musical intermezzi by Francis Poulenc, Olivier Messiaen and Roy Orbison.

De Standaard ***, 1 January 2020